Rock-Art

Fels-Kudu
Felsmalereien-robbe
Felsmalereien-undefiniert_01
Fels-Robbe
Felsmalereien-schakal_oder_hyaene
Felsmalereien-frau_loewe_02
Felsmalereien-kudu_05
Felsmalereien-laufender_jaeger
Felsmalereien-undefiniert_03
Felsmalereien-undefiniert_02
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Well-preserved rock carvings created by Namibia’s indigenous hunter-gatherer people have long been known on the farm grounds.
Scientific research brought more elements to light in 2005.
The paintings are mostly done in shades of red, the colour pigment having been ground to powder from Rötelstein (hematite), a ferrous rock. The powder was mixed with blood or egg whites from bird eggs. Even today, body colour is produced in this composition.
Once applied, the ‘paint’ virtually penetrates and chemically binds with the surface it is applied on. Due to this chemical bond, rock art paintings fade only after centuries or even millennia, as there is no actual ‘paint on canvas’.
Animal hair or bird feathers attached to wooden sticks or bones were used as paint brushes.

Several large caves discovered near the rock paintings suggest that over decades different groups of people visited the sites over and over again.

Due to high temperatures during the day, we usually offer this tour soon after breakfast only, and it lasts for about two hours. Please accommodate this in your travel schedule.